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Power Edison Unveils Industry-Leading Utility-Grade Mobile Energy Storage System

The TerraCharge™ Platform: Redefining Energy Storage with Mobility and Flexibility

KEARNY, NJ- September 13, 2023-Power Edison, a pioneering developer and provider of utility-scale mobile energy storage systems, proudly announces the unveiling of its next-generation utility-grade trailer-based system. Designed with mobility, modularity, and flexibility in mind, the TerraCharge platform is set to revolutionize the energy storage industry.

Power Edison has collaborated closely with major U.S. electric utilities and industry partners to deliver a fleet of these innovative systems. The TerraCharge platform sets new industry standards through multiple innovations. The architecture separates the battery trailers from Power Conversion System (PCS) trailers, providing maximum flexibility and modularity. 

 

"Our new TerraCharge platform incorporates a wide range of critical features requested by our partners over the years to meet their real-life challenges. The platform supports multiple battery technologies, grid and off-grid voltages, underground and overhead interconnection managed by a cyber-hardened, energy and fleet management system," said Dr. Shihab Kuran, President and CEO of Power Edison. 

TerraCharge leverages the latest in battery technology, primarily utilizing lithium-ion but remaining technologically agnostic. Power Edison has forged partnerships with global battery manufacturers to produce road-worthy battery modules, racks, and enclosures. Safety is paramount, with UL9540a testing and backup UPS systems to power fire detection and retardation systems. The battery trailers include multiple levels of disconnects, air-cooled systems with redundant industrial HVAC units, and an optional cold weather package. Liquid-cooled batteries are also offered for enhanced energy densities.

The PCS trailers house essential equipment, including inverters, transformers, switchgear, and control equipment, enabling seamless connection to various voltage classes, including 120/208V, 277/480V, 4kV, 13kV, 27kV, and 33kV. These trailers are fully customizable to meet diverse power needs, voltages, and interconnection methods. All systems are equipped with plug-and-play cables with the ability to connect to overhead, ground-level and underground connections. The PCS trailers come equipped with an optional robotic mast, which when erected can reach up to 30ft in the air enabling overhead connections up to 33kV.

 

Both trailer types are engineered for stability and durability, featuring vibration dampening equipment on deck and built-in air ride suspension. Onboard monitoring includes vibration, acceleration and GPS tracking, with an optional off-road package for rugged environments.

 

"As the energy landscape evolves, so does our commitment to delivering cutting-edge solutions. TerraCharge embodies our relentless focus on providing our customers with the most advanced, flexible, and efficient mobile energy storage technology available. We're excited to empower businesses and utilities to harness the power of energy on their terms," said Yazan Harasis, Director of Projects at Power Edison.

 

The TerraCharge platform offers grid-forming and grid-following capabilities, serving a wide range of applications, including renewable integration, peak shaving, microgrids, genset hybridization, black start, backup power, and EV charging support. Power Edison’s utility-grade cyber secure controller with integrated utility SCADA systems allows participation in all energy storage applications with remote operation and monitoring capabilities.

 

Power Edison's commitment to innovation and adaptability continues to drive the energy storage industry forward. Power Edison is experiencing high demand for these solutions and is inviting interested parties to visit our website for more information and connect with our teams. Power Edison offers the Battery trailers and PCS trailers as a full package or separately as needed by our customers.

 

About Power Edison
Power Edison is a leading developer and provider of utility-scale mobile energy storage systems. With a focus on innovation and collaboration, we deliver flexible and reliable energy solutions to meet the evolving needs of the energy sector.

Contacts

For media inquiries, please contact:
Yazan Harasis
Director
Power Edison
908-312-1242
yharasis@poweredison.com
www.poweredison.com

WATCHUNG, NJ, NOV. 11, 2021 – Power Edison, the leading developer and provider of utility-scale mobile energy storage solutions, is partnering with sustainability champion Hugo Neu Realty Management of New Jersey -and other stakeholders- to deploy the largest electric vehicle (EV) charging hub in the United States.  This signature project —to be comprised of more than 200 high-power fast chargers— will be sited at Kearny Point Industrial Park, 10 minutes from the Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal, and 10 minutes from New York City.  It is anticipated that this EV charging hub, serving the high-traffic Tri-State region, will power thousands of light, medium and heavy duty vehicles daily — in addition to charging electric marine vessels.  As world leaders meet at COP26, the message is clear that we are significantly behind on climate change action.  This innovative partnership is accelerating meaningful community-centric solutions that will improve livability for frontline communities — while reducing harmful GHG emissions.
“Power Edison is engaged with leading organizations such as Hugo Neu to make EV charging accessible and ubiquitous,” said Shihab Kuran, Ph.D., CEO of Power Edison.  “Power Edison leverages its innovative solutions, including mobile truck and barge battery systems, to develop fast charging hubs expeditiously. Our utility-scale mobile power solutions allow us to develop charging sites without having to wait for the typical lengthy power utility infrastructure upgrade process.  We welcome fleet owners, charging network operators, vehicle manufacturers and other EV stakeholders to contact us for more information and to reserve capacity.”
 
“In working with Power Edison to develop this strategically located EV charging hub, we’re bringing about an evolution in the sustainable use of land in this 130-Acre industrial campus,” noted property owner Wendy Neu, CEO of Hugo Neu Realty Management.  “The transportation sector remains the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in New Jersey, accounting for over 40% of emissions along with other harmful pollutants.  For decades, Kearny and the surrounding areas have been over-exposed to these pollutants.  By deploying hundreds of EV chargers at Kearny Point, we will significantly reduce GHGs to help mitigate climate change and improve air quality for disproportionately burdened environmental justice communities in the area.  Our innovative partnership with Power Edison is comprehensive in its approach to transforming this key location (located between the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers, off Route 9) into model beacons of clean, renewable energy / transportation, while growing local economies.”
 
“Delivering more than 200 megawatts (200MW) and 4800 megawatt-hours (4800MWh) of daily capacity, Power Edison’s new hub is an exciting and impactful EV super charging site,” noted Pamela Frank, CEO of ChargeEVC-NJ, a business association comprised of diverse interests that advocates for electrification of transportation (chargevc.org).  “We’re thrilled that Power Edison and Hugo Neu have joined forces with other key players in the electric vehicle charging arena in bringing this electrification-of-transportation project to fruition in New Jersey.”
 
“Our engineered power solutions will initially offer over 250kW of power per charger and scale up to over 1MW per charger as vehicle technology evolves. This enables industry-leading fast charging for light, medium and heavy duty vehicles alike.  Inherent in our design is flexibility, modularity and ability to integrate renewables, batteries and other technologies for added sustainability and resiliency,” said Yazan Harasis, Director of Projects at Power Edison.
 
Power Edison is led by industry veterans with experience in power generation, transmission, distribution, power conversion and smart grid. Power Edison is expanding its team and hiring to further support its growth.
 
With the significant need for EV charging solutions, Power Edison launched a new subsidiary called EV Edison (www.ev-edison.com) dedicated to the development of high-power fast charging hubs.
 
About Power Edison
Power Edison is a leading developer and provider of clean energy solutions. The company’s proprietary technology offerings include patent-pending hardware and software for land and marine based Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) and for Electric Vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure. Power Edison development portfolio includes energy storage, solar energy, EV charging, fuel cells and hydrogen. Power Edison has a development and sales pipeline of over 1GWh of battery storage projects.
 
Media Relations
T 908-312-1242
media@poweredison.com

Power Edison Partnership to Develop the Nation’s Largest Electric Vehicle Charging Site in Metropolitan New York Area

 

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Power Edison is putting megawatt-scale batteries on truck trailers and barges to bring more flexibility to a costly yet valuable energy-storage resource.

Study after study has shown that the power grid of the future is going to need a lot of batteries. To meet that need without breaking the bank, those batteries must be as affordable as possible. But they also need to be deployed in the right places.

 

Shihab Kuran, CEO of Power Edison, argues that mobile batteries hit the sweet spot in many use cases. They entail extra costs and complications, but their value is maximized by the ability to move them from place to place and quickly interconnect them with the grid.

 

Over the past five years, Power Edison has built up the equipment and expertise to make mobile, utility-scale batteries a reality, from early-stage pilots with New York utility Con Edison to a gigawatt-scale pipeline of projects with utilities whose identities have not yet been made public by the company.

 

Last month, the company announced its biggest project yet: an electric-vehicle charging hub in its home state of New Jersey. At its peak, the hub aims to support up to 200 megawatts of heavy-duty electric vehicles serving one of the country’s busiest seaport complexes, making it one of the biggest EV charging facilities announced to date in the U.S.

 

It could take years for a utility to upgrade the local power grid to support that kind of EV charging load. But batteries can get the job done much quicker — and mobile batteries mean it can be done with a high level of flexibility.

Putting batteries on truck trailers or barges, instead of installing them on concrete pads, enables a site to be more nimble in terms of matching different amounts of storage to shifting charging demands, Kuran said. It also allows depleted batteries to be replaced by ones recently recharged at sites without grid constraints.

 

Eventually, if and when the grid infrastructure is expanded to meet a site’s charging needs, those mobile batteries can be moved on to the next location, he said. That’s valuable not only to the sites that need batteries but also to the owners and financial backers of the batteries.

 

After all, every battery that’s permanently installed at a site is making a bet that its value is going to hold firm for years into the future. But with a fast-evolving set of grid needs and the vagaries of matching energy-storage values to individual sites, that’s not always a safe bet, he said.

 

“Financing mobile systems is much safer compared to stationary systems,” Kuran said. ​“Storage sometimes has a limited economic outlook at a particular location. Mobility — if you can do it cost-effectively — can perform multiple services and stack up revenues not just at one location, but at multiple locations.”

 

Mobility to serve the energy storage value stack 

 

Energy storage analysts have identified dozens of use cases for batteries, as well as how these use cases can be ​“stacked” to make more money from a single battery installation, as this chart from the utility-backed nonprofit Electric Power Research Institute indicates.

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The ability of a battery to stack use cases depends on multiple factors. Those include whether a battery is installed in a building or connected to the larger grid, as well as who owns the battery and the regulations that determine how they’re allowed to make money.

 

A battery’s usefulness is also highly dependent on where it is and when it’s available. That’s particularly true for batteries being used to mitigate peak loads and stresses on grid circuits or substations that would otherwise need major capital upgrades, a use case known as transmission and distribution (T&D) upgrade deferral or a ​“non-wires alternative.”

 

But those T&D upgrade deferral values are hard to predict years in advance. Maybe loads increase faster than expected, forcing a utility to pay well ahead of schedule for the upgrades the battery was meant to defer. Permanently installed batteries at that location aren’t as valuable anymore — but if they can be moved, that value can be put to use somewhere else.

 

Conversely, a utility may foresee the need to build grid infrastructure for a new subdivision or factory, but it isn’t sure when or if that new grid demand will actually show up. ​“The utility would love, if they were able, to delay the upgrade decision until they knew for sure you were building a factory,” Kuran said. ​“Mobile batteries allow a utility to defer, defer, defer” until the need actually materializes.

 

EV charging represents the latest manifestation of this chicken-or-egg problem for utilities trying to plan their future grid infrastructure needs. But the massive scale of EV growth needed to meet decarbonization goals could rapidly overwhelm utilities’ ability to deliver enough power.

 

Existing grid constraints are already driving an increasing number of EV charging sites to include batteries. Power Edison has launched a new subsidiary, EV Edison, specifically targeting that market, Kuran said.\

 

“Even if the utility is working 24/7, you’re dealing with eminent-domain issues, siting, digging up the streets,” he said. ​“But you can do it in a modular fashion — and if the uptake happens faster than the utility upgrade, our truck and barge mobile solution is there.”

 

Given these advantages, Power Edison has ​“had a number of business partners say, ​‘Why would we ever buy a stationary storage system?’” 

 

The challenges of making batteries mobile 

 

Analyst Daniel Finn-Foley has an answer to that rhetorical question. There are still plenty of use cases that favor permanently sited batteries, said Finn-Foley, an energy transition and energy storage specialist with PA Consulting.

 

“Energy storage is a game of tight margins,” he said in an interview. ​“If you know there’s going to be a need for 20 years in a location, then you’re going to lock it down because it just makes more sense.” The tens or hundreds of megawatts of energy storage being added to solar and wind farms demonstrate a prime use case for stationary batteries.

 

Moving batteries from site to site also isn’t as easy as it might sound, he said. ​“There are hurdles around moving batteries to meet those locational needs. Do the benefits of making the technology mobile outweigh the costs?”

 

Kuran acknowledged those challenges, which Power Edison has spent the past five years working on. ​“To do this cost-effectively, you have to have properly engineered mobile solutions,” he said. ​“A makeshift solution is not going to work.”

 

First of all, batteries are heavy, Kuran said. Many of the containerized systems Power Edison transports require specially designed trailers with multiple axles, as well as designs that distribute the weight of the battery cells and supporting equipment in ways that don’t violate federal and state-by-state transportation regulations.

 

Second, batteries need to be handled carefully to avoid damage or disruption. Many battery manufacturers will void warranties if they’re moved without proper precautions, he said. Power Edison has subjected its transport systems to vibration and bracing tests to ensure battery chemistries and power electronics connections aren’t harmed in transit.

 

Third, mobile batteries have to be engineered to be interconnected at their host sites quickly and with a minimum of complications, Kuran said. ​“If you’re mobile, you don’t want to have a month of connecting” at the end of each relocation. Power Edison has engineered switchgear and interconnection equipment to make the process as seamless as possible. ​“We even have patents filed for quick connect and disconnect, whether on barges or trucks,” he said.

 

All of this comes at a cost premium compared to containerized batteries destined for permanent installation. ​“On a variable cost, we might be 30 percent more from an equipment perspective,” he said. But the engineering and construction costs of preparing sites for stationary storage can eat away at that cost difference, he said.

 

In fact, he says, ​“we’ve found our solution is more cost-effective than a stationary solution, even if it stays in one place,” he said. ​“Now, if you move it even once, you’re ahead of the game.”

 

Mobile batteries could also help utilities get double duty out of the same batteries for changing seasonal needs. Some parts of the grid are stressed by summer air-conditioning demand, while others are stressed by winter heating demand, he noted. ​“Why not keep yourself open to the possibility that if a battery is being used in one place in the summer, I can use it somewhere else in the winter?”

 

Bottlenecks can still slow this approach, Finn-Foley noted. ​“Interconnection costs and delays are key barriers for energy storage development,” he said. Adding megawatts of batteries to a utility’s power grid requires extensive interconnection studies that can take six months to a year, whether those batteries are stationary or mobile.

 

But in some cases, Power Edison’s batteries can start working at a site before those interconnections are approved if it’s cost-effective to shuttle discharged batteries out and replace them with batteries charged elsewhere, Kuran said.

 

That’s an expensive proposition, compared to delivering electricity over the grid, Finn-Foley noted. ​“We don’t usually drive tractor-trailers full of water or natural gas from one part of the city to another.”

 

Still, given the immense pressure on utilities to support fast-growing EV charging loads, these kinds of options may become tenable, Finn-Foley said. The big question is whether mobile batteries can find enough value in being moved from place to place over their operating lifetime to make them worthwhile.

 

“I wouldn’t say that the locational value of storage has been fully recognized yet,” Finn-Foley continued. ​“If that happens, and when that happens, will be the key.”

Power Edison Supplying World’s Largest Mobile Battery Energy Storage System

 

 

WATCHUNG, NJ, APRIL 20, 2021 – Power Edison, the leading developer and provider of utility-scale mobile energy storage solutions, has been contracted by a major U.S. utility to deliver the system this year. At more than three megawatts (3MW) and twelve megawatt-hours (12MWh) of capacity, it will be the world’s largest trailer-based battery energy storage system.

 

“We’re engaged with industry-leading utilities on mobile storage, developing techno-economic analyses, advanced engineered solutions, utility filings and commercial deployments.” said Shihab Kuran, Ph.D., CEO of Power Edison. “Mobile and flexible solutions provide higher reliability and unlock additional benefits for electric utilities enabling them to make prudent investments on behalf of their ratepayers.”

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Utilities are increasingly confronted with grid stresses and constraints. To meet these dynamic challenges, Power Edison has developed robust utility-grade battery storage solutions – with cutting-edge technology that provide reliability when it’s needed and where it’s needed. Power Edison’s engineered solutions incorporate best of breed batteries, inverters, switchgear, safety equipment, mobile transportation platforms and state-of-the-art software for battery, energy and fleet management. Energy storage has key reliability and economic applications for electric utilities and the commercial and industrial sectors.  This includes grid resiliency, demand management, renewables integration, EV charging support and backup power.

 

Power Edison has also developed barge-based batteries that are at the core of its marine-based solutions. The initial set of its 500MWh+ development pipeline is going through final permitting and about to start construction. Power Edison’s barge fleet bring grid storage to key locations where land is at a premium or not available.

 

“Power Edison has key industry partnerships and a broad solutions portfolio that includes energy storage, solar energy, EV charging, fuel cells and hydrogen.” added Kuran. “We are experiencing strong traction with customers and with investors who are looking to deploy our solutions and leverage our industry expertise.”

 

“We have developed a full range of innovative, patent-pending solutions offering industry-leading features such as enhanced cybersecurity, ‘plug-and-play’ integration and modularity.” said Yazan Harasis, Director of Projects at Power Edison. “Our software provides asset owners and operators a unified control platform for the various technology assets.”

 

Power Edison is led by industry veterans with experience in power generation, transmission, distribution, power conversion and smart grid. Power Edison is expanding its team and hiring to further support its growth.

 

About Power Edison

 

Power Edison is a leading developer and provider of renewable energy solutions. The company’s proprietary technology offerings include patent-pending hardware and software for land and marine based Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) and for Electric Vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure. Power Edison development portfolio includes energy storage, solar energy, EV charging, fuel cells and hydrogen. Power Edison has a development and sales pipeline of over 1GWh of battery storage projects.

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Getting extra power to where it’s needed is a tricky business, often requiring millions of dollars in investments. Now a solar-industry veteran has proposed a cheaper alternative: juice stored in batteries that are delivered by truck, rail or barge.

Shihab Kuran, who founded Petra Systems Inc. and also worked at NRG Energy Inc. and SunEdison Inc., has now formed Power Edison LLC, which offers grid-scale lithium-ion battery systems encased in specialized shipping containers that can be stacked like Legos. The Green Brook, New Jersey-based company was formed in March and formally announced Thursday.

 

The units would let utilities dispatch storage systems to match shifting demand and defer costly upgrades to the grid. Portability also allows businesses to send batteries to where power is needed most, like Canada in winter and Brazil in summer.

“We are the Uber of battery storage,” Kuran said in an interview. “We’re going to offer a solution for the duration that it’s needed, and after that, we’ll take our solution and re-purpose that for other applications.”

Power Edison’s offering comes as utilities like Consolidated Edison Inc. seek to employ new technologies like storage to avoid spending millions to beef up electricity networks to accommodate rising consumption. The amount of storage capacity installed globally is forecast to reach 750 megawatts this year, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance, up from 160 megawatts in 2014.

 

Easy Delivery

Kuran, who previously headed storage businesses at NRG and SunEdison, said the key to his strategy is making batteries easier to move. Lithium-ion systems are complicated to transport. They are heavy, sensitive to temperature changes and prone to bursting into flames. To solve that problem, Power Edison designed containers to protect them from the rigors of travel.

“Today if you want to move an energy storage container by code you have to empty the batteries out, you have to put them into cool containers, you have to transport them separately,” Kuran said. “It’s a very expensive process.”

First Project

 

​Another part of the strategy is leasing the batteries instead of selling them, cutting costs for utilities, Kuran said. Utilities typically rely on battery storage for one to three years before major upgrades are needed to meet rising power demand. The containers, measuring up to 40 feet (12 meters) long, will have a capacity of one megawatt-hour. The company is taking orders now and the first project is expected to be unveiled this year.

Clean energy advocates have long considered storage the elusive link to better incorporating energy into the grid from wind and solar farms, where production ebbs and flows based on breezes and sunshine.

“Solving the storage problem, in my humble opinion, is the last obstacle before allowing renewables to become a meaningful source of energy that can tackle climate change,’’ Kuran said. “Renewables, they suffer from intermittency and they are not a dispatchable energy source, so energy storage remains to be the Holy Grail that many in the industry are working on.”

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Dive Brief:

  • Power Edison LLC, a startup based in New Jersey, is offering grid-scale lithium-ion battery systems housed in shipping containers that can be stacked like Legos and delivered via truck, rail or barge, Bloomberg reports. 

  • As part of its strategy, Power Edison leases its batteries rather than selling them, cutting costs for utilities.

  • The Green Brook, New Jersey, company was founded by Shihab Kuran, who founded Petra Systems Inc. and also worked at NRG Energy and SunEdison.


Dive Insight:

Lithium-ion batteries are on the forefront of a boom in energy storage deployments. They dominated the makeup of storage projects in 2015, according to Navigant Consulting, composing more than half of newly announced energy storage system capacity and more than 85% of deployed power capacity.

But li-ion technology is not without its problems. It is difficult to transport li-ion batteries. They are heavy, sensitive to temperature changes and prone to bursting into flames. To address those problems, Power Edison designed containers to protect them from the rigors of travel.

“We are the Uber of battery storage,” Shihab Kuran, Power Edison’s founder said in an interview with Bloomberg.

“Today if you want to move an energy storage container by code you have to empty the batteries out, you have to put them into cool containers, you have to transport them separately,” Kuran said. “It’s a very expensive process.”

Making storage mobile allows utilities to dispatch storage systems to match shifting demand and defer costly upgrades to the grid. It also allows businesses to send batteries to where power is needed most, like Canada in winter and Brazil in summer.

Utilities typically rely on battery storage for one to three years before major upgrades are needed to meet rising power demand.

The containers, measure up to 40 feet long, and will have a capacity of 1 MWh. Power Edison expects to unveil its first project this year.

“We’re going to offer a solution for the duration that it’s needed, and after that, we’ll take our solution and re-purpose that for other applications,” Kuran said.

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Yahoo Finance covering Con Edison's Storage on Demand project which Power Edison is involved in.

 

Con Edison Storing the Future for Energy Customers

NEW YORK, NY--(Marketwired - February 28, 2017) - Con Edison has filed a project that will bring battery storage technology to New York City neighborhoods to help keep service reliable during the hot summer months.

 

By the summer of 2018, the company will deploy batteries capable of sending 1 megawatt of power for four hours into the grid to serve homes and businesses. Con Edison will determine where to deploy the batteries each summer based on the needs of its electrical networks.

The project, called "Storage on Demand," is the second battery demonstration project Con Edison has filed in 2017. The company believes both projects will produce insights leading to more widespread adoption of large-scale battery storage to benefit electrical delivery systems and customers. The projects support the state's Reforming the Energy Vision initiative.

 

"Battery storage technology is advancing quickly and can provide us with another tool to keep our service reliable on the days our customers need it the most," said Matthew Ketschke, Con Edison's vice president, Distributed Resource Integration. "Battery storage can also help us defer making upgrades to our infrastructure, saving our customers money."

 

Con Edison has formed a partnership with NRG Energy, which owns almost 50,000 megawatts of generation capacity across the United States, to develop and build the units at NRG's generating station in Astoria, Queens. Storage on Demand will consist of two mobile battery trailers and one mobile electrical switchgear trailer.

 

When Con Edison and its customers do not need the batteries, the units will be stored at the generating station and the partners will sell peak-shaving, contingency support and other services into the New York Independent System Operator wholesale market.

While Con Edison plans on deploying the units during the summer, the batteries will also be available at other times of the year when an electrical network needs short-term support.

 

In its other storage demonstration project, filed in January, Con Edison will work with microgrid developer GI Energy to place "front-of-the-meter," 1 megawatt/1 megawatt hour batteries at the properties of four customers. Con Edison will make quarterly lease payments to those customers.

 

The company would charge the batteries during off-peak times and discharge them during peak times to support Con Edison's system or in wholesale markets. 

One site will also include an Urban Electric Power 200 kilowatt/400 kilowatt hour zinc manganese dioxide battery system that may provide increased flexibility at indoor battery sites.

 

That project, if successful, would provide an alternative to more traditional "behind-the-meter" batteries. Those batteries are owned by customers who store power in the units and then use that power to reduce their peak demand.

But those batteries make economic sense for only a small number of commercial customers -- those who pay demand charges and have highly fluctuating needs for power.

 

New York State's Reforming the Energy Vision program, or REV, encourages energy companies to use new technology to provide reliable, resilient service and to offer customers more access to products and services like energy efficiency, smart usage programs and renewables.

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